Fabric To Close Permanently After Losing Licence

Islington Council has ruled against the London club.

London club fabric will remain closed after having its licence revoked by Islington Council. 

Members of the council sat down yesterday evening (Tuesday, September 6th) at Islington Town Hall with representatives from fabric, Islington Public Health Authority, Islington License Authority and the Metropolitan Police. The hearing, which lasted more than six hours, reached its conclusion just after 1 AM on Wednesday morning when Subcommittee Chair Flora Williamson read out the ruling against the Farringdon venue. 

"A culture of drugs exists at the club which the existing management and security appear incapable of controlling," she concluded. "This subcommittee has considered adding further conditions, but has come to the conclusion that this would not address the serious concern that they have with management of the premises." 

 





About 40 people, including fabric staff members, watched on from the Town Hall's upstairs gallery as the committee heard depositions in favour of fabric from the club's co-founder Cameron Leslie, NTIA chairman Alan Miller, artist Kate Simko and Proud Galleries owner Alex Proud. Earlier, Metropolitan Police presented their evidence, during which they accused the club of being tolerant towards drug use. 

fabric's licence was suspended and put up for review in August following the recent drug-related deaths of two 18-year-olds, Ryan Browne and Jack Crossley. The club has been closed since Friday, August 12th. In that time, the global dance music community has rallied around fabric, with a change.org petition garnering more than 140,000 signatures. Islington South and Finsbury MP Emily Thornberry also voiced her support, writing via Facebook that "the closure of fabric cannot be the answer." 

Representatives from fabric have issued several statements of their own, promising to independently review the club's procedures with regards to safety and drug policy. Along similar lines, director and co-founder Cameron Leslie also pledged to pursue a "gold standard" for safe clubbing after the Met Police called the venue "a safe haven for the supply and consumption of illegal drugs." 

Bron: Resident Advisor




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